Market Basket Measure – StatsCan consultation

Help us validate how we measure poverty

 Dear Sir/Madam,

Statistics Canada has launched a crowdsourcing initiative to validate how we measure poverty. We are seeking your support to increase awareness among your organization’s clients, supporters and stakeholders.

We’ve created a short questionnaire that allows Canadians to provide input on current estimates of how much money a family needs for items like food, clothing, shelter and transportation.

The questionnaire takes no more than five minutes to complete, and will be open to all Canadians from October 15, 2018, to January 31, 2019. Participation is anonymous and respondent information is protected by the Privacy Act.

To ensure strong participation rates, here are some ways to help us spread the word:

  • Add the attached image to your website and link to www.statcan.gc.ca/measuringpoverty
  • Inform your clients, supporters and stakeholders using the attached email
  • Follow us on social media and repost our content (a copy of our campaign is attached)

If you have questions, please reply directly to this email. statcan.market.basket.measure-mesure.du.panier.de.consommation.statcan(at)canada.ca

For more information on this initiative, please visit www.statcan.gc.ca/measuringpoverty.

Thank you in advance for supporting Statistics Canada’s ability to accurately measure low income and poverty.

Income Statistics Division – Market Basket Measure

statcan.market.basket.measure-mesure.du.panier.de.consommation.statcan(at)canada.ca

Statistics Canada / Government of Canada”

Poverty Trends 2018 – Citizens for Public Justice

The Citizens for Public Justice has issued the report Poverty Trends 2018. Read it here:
https://www.cpj.ca/poverty-trends-2018

Poverty Trends Report 2018

The report identifies several key demographics of people in Canada that have particularly high poverty rates. The rates for provinces and territories and major cities are also put forward.

PFS conference brings attention to poverty issues

The PFS Conference “Be Part of the Solution: Let’s End Poverty” garnered some good in-depth media coverage.

Two Regina Leader Post articles

Affordable housing – RLP Oct 18, 2018

Affordable housing key to ending poverty crisis in Regina, says advocate

Poverty by the numbers – RLP Oct 18, 2018

U of R professor breaks down poverty in Saskatchewan by the numbers

Poverty in Saskatchewan – 2016. Using Official Poverty Line.

New update – a summary of poverty in Saskatchewan using the recently announced federal Official Poverty Line.   In 2016 there were 98,000 persons in poverty in the province for a poverty rate of 9.2 per cent.  Groups with high rates of poverty include children in female lone-parent families, adults aged 18-64 not living in families, Indigenous persons, recent immigrants, and disabled persons.  See the full report at uregina.ca/~gingrich/skp2016.pdf

CWP gives SK Poverty Reduction Plan a failing grade

Canada Without Poverty gives Saskatchewan’s Poverty Reduction Plan a failing grade

Poverty Free Saskatchewan is highlighting a national assessment that shows Saskatchewan is much behind other provinces in its efforts to eliminate poverty.

Canada Without Poverty (CWP) recently issued its annual progress profiles on all Canadian province and territories poverty plans. The 2017 Poverty Progress Profiles report was prepared using a human rights framework with ten success indicators.  http://www.cwp-csp.ca/2018/02/provinces-and-territories-make-limited-progress-on-economic-and-social-rights-report/

In order for a poverty strategy to be based on human rights, CWP says, the plan must meet a number of criteria.

Saskatchewan’s effort in this regard, Taking Action on Poverty: The Saskatchewan Poverty Reduction Strategy, was released by the provincial government in 2016. Its aim was to reduce the number of Saskatchewan people who experience poverty for two years or more by 50 per cent by the end of 2025. https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2016/february/24/poverty-reduction-strategy

Saskatchewan’s strategy is in compliance with only two of the ten CWP indicators, #2 and #5. It is somewhat in compliance with #6, and not in compliance with the remaining seven.

  1. Ensure human rights training for those involved in developing and implementing the strategy. (*SK – SOMEWHAT*)
  2. Identify and address systemic discrimination and inequality. (*SK – YES*)  
  3. Explicitly refer to human rights obligations. (*SK – NO*)
  4. Be enshrined in the law. (*SK – NO*)
  5. Include representatives of diverse groups experiencing poverty in developing, implementing, and evaluating the strategy. (*SK – YES*)
  6. Set rigorous goals and timelines for achieving identified strategy goals. (*SK – SOMEWHAT*)
  7. Develop transparent mechanisms and indicators to monitor and track progress. (*SK – NO*)
  8. Report annually and publicly on progress. (*SK – NO*)
  9. Be a budget priority. (*SK – NO*)
  10. Create a space for individuals to claim rights and hold their government accountable to the strategy. (*SK – NO*)

CWP also noted that child poverty in Saskatchewan is very high and the poverty level for Indigenous children living off reserve and on reserve is extremely high. The province’s minimum wage is second lowest in Canada. And food insecurity in Northern Saskatchewan is a very serious concern.

The Saskatchewan government has not presented to the public a comprehensive evaluation report on achievement of its poverty reduction goals.

Dec 6 talk – “Poverty Reduction & the Current Sask Economic Climate”

JSGS Public Lecture ~ Poverty Reduction and the Current Saskatchewan Economic Climate – on December 6, 2016.
This event will be moderated by Dr. Daniel Béland, JSGS, and will feature a panel:
Chuk Plante, PhD Student, McGill University
Ali Abukar, Executive Director, Saskatoon Open Door Society
Caitlin Olauson, Centre for Integrative Medicine, University of Saskatchewan
Bill Mintram, Executive Director, Saskatoon Indian & Métis Friendship Centre
In 2015 the Government of Saskatchewan committed to, and developed, a poverty reduction strategy. Over the course of the past year, agencies and sectors that work in communities to reduce poverty have been patiently awaiting an implementation plan for the strategy. Now faced with the current economic downturn and looming provincial budget cuts, it is time to open a conversation about how critical it is to invest in poverty reduction in times of economic decline. This conversation will capture the historical background of poverty reduction strategies in Saskatchewan and across Canada, address the economic argument for investing in poverty reduction and provide 3 distinct sector perspectives to increase awareness of how important social investment is to our province.
December 06, 2016
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Saskatoon: Prairie Room, Diefenbaker Centre, University of Saskatchewan
Regina (Video Conference): Room 210, 2 Research Drive, University of Regina
There is no cost to attend, but those interested in attending are encouraged to register as seating is limited.
Complete event details and online registration available here.
 
 

Large numbers of Sask children live in poverty

Child and Family Poverty in Saskatchewan
November 2016
by Paul Gingrich, Garson Hunter, Miguel Sanchez
http://campaign2000.ca/…/upl…/2016/11/SASKReportCard2016.pdf

Canada 2000 released national and provincial reports on November 24, 2016.

News Coverage

Global Regina news coverage “Child poverty rates in Saskatchewan higher than national average” http://globalnews.ca/news/3086534/child-poverty-rates-in-saskatchewan-higher-than-national-average/

CTV Regina newsclip http://www.ctvnews.ca/one-in-10-canadian-children-live-in-poverty-report-1.457428

Regina Leader Post article “1 in 4 Sask. children live in poverty: U of R report” http://leaderpost.com/news/saskatchewan/one-in-four-sask-children-live-in-poverty-u-of-r-report

CTV national coverage of the situation Canada-wide “1 in 10 children live in poverty” http://www.ctvnews.ca/one-in-10-canadian-children-live-in-poverty-report-1.457428